Commit 26b8f856 authored by paysan's avatar paysan

Fixed no blanks after ( comment typos

parent 8d24e583
......@@ -203,7 +203,7 @@ For instance, these two ``skip-line''s keep the definition of
encountering either right parenthesis:
\begin{Code}
\ : NUTATE ( x y z )
\ SWAP ROT (NUTATE) ;
\ SWAP ROT ( NUTATE) ;
\end{Code}
\forthb{\bs S} is pronounced ``skip-screen.'' It causes the \Forth{}
interpreter to stop interpreting the screen entirely, as though there
......
......@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ But text isn't always 10 characters long. To make the phrase useful
for any string, you'd factor out the length by writing:
\begin{Code}
: CENTER (length -- ) 80 SWAP - 2/ SPACES ;
: CENTER ( length -- ) 80 SWAP - 2/ SPACES ;
\end{Code}
The data stack can also be used to pass addresses. Therefore what's
factored out may be a \emph{pointer} to data rather than the data
......@@ -362,7 +362,7 @@ memory-efficient than the following approach using defining words:
By using a defining word, we save memory because each compiled colon
definition needs the address of \forthb{EXIT} to conclude the
definition.(In defining eight words, the use of a defining word saves
definition. (In defining eight words, the use of a defining word saves
14 bytes on a 16-bit \Forth{}.) Also, in a colon definition each
reference to a numeric literal requires the compilation of
\forthb{LIT}\index{L!LIT} (or \forthb{literal}), another 2 bytes per
......@@ -711,7 +711,7 @@ because it prints a final space.
Here's a better factoring found in some \Forth{} systems:
\begin{Code}
: (.) (n -- a #) DUP ABS 0 <# #S ROT SIGN #> ;
: (.) ( n -- a #) DUP ABS 0 <# #S ROT SIGN #> ;
: . ( n) (.) TYPE SPACE ;
\end{Code}
We find another example of failing to factor the output function from
......
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